These varied practices are an opportunity to adopt a new rhythm of life, preparing our hearts for the great drama and joy of Holy Week and Easter. A shift in liturgical tone contributes to the spiritual formation of your congregation in a unique way.

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Lenten Worship Services

We will soon be entering into a 40-day period of preparation for the Easter celebration, the sacred season of Lent. Lent is an intentional journey that we take as a church community – a journey of reflection, prayer, repentance and acts of mercy. It is a season where we agree to befriend the fact that all is not well with our soul. This is why we devote attention to the discipline of self-examination during Lent.


The Episcopal/Anglican tradition offers rich resources to do all this in our worship during Lent. These varied practices are an opportunity to adopt a new rhythm of life, preparing our hearts for the great drama and joy of Holy Week and Easter. A shift in liturgical tone contributes to the spiritual formation of your congregation in a unique way.


Our Wyoming Worship Committee has compiled two different liturgies for use throughout this powerful season of Lent. One liturgy uses Episcopal resources and is close to the more traditional style of the Book of Common Prayer (which we are terming “Complementary”). The second liturgy draws on a variety of sources and has a contemporary tone (which we have termed “Uncommon”). The WyoWorship Committee is also providing Prayers of the People for the season, as well as a lectionary with inclusive collects and readings from a different Bible translation, one that is geared toward public reading.


We are encouraging the clergy, liturgy teams and worship leaders in our churches to use all or parts of these Lenten resources. In this regard, for the sake of continuity, as you prepare to use this material for Lent, we recommend that y

ou use the same liturgy, Complementary or Uncommon, throughout the entire season.

My prayer is that your church’s Lenten worship would be a time set apart from ordinary rhythms for the particular purpose of drawing nearer to God and experiencing the simplicity and depth of the Divine Embrace.


I leave you with these simple yet profound Lenten words by Brother Charles de Foucauld, the Catholic priest, monk and martyr who lived among the nomadic Tuareg peoples in the Sahara in Algeria, N. Africa, in the early 20th century.


“To receive the grace of God you must go to the desert and stay awhile.”

Lenten Documents

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Lectionary

Readings

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Music

Suggestions

Sample

Bulletin

Word & Prayer

Raw Materials

The Holy Eucharist

Raw Materials